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Coursework at CMU

Transportation Related Course

SemesterCourse Title
LevelUnitsCourse#
College
Professor
Description
24SMaterial Histories UG948367ArchitectureTorello, FrancescaMaterials affect the way we engage with a building and carry cultural meanings connected with complex histories, deeply and at times messily intertwined with the social, political and ecological context. In this seminar we will look at the history of the architecture of the last two centuries by following the thread of the history of materials. We will discuss the ways in which buildings of the past and the practice of architecture were affected by which materials were available, how they were produced, and the craft required to work them. We will reflect on how architects interpreted, manipulated, or added to those meanings through their own work. Materials' lifecycles and the networks of extraction, production, transportation, and reuse had an impact on the built environment in the past, just as they do today. We will learn from historical examples to assess the consequences of the choices we make as designers. Finally, we will critically engage with the presence of history as a layer of complexity embedded in the material itself - an effect that is compounded in the practice of reuse of materials with patina, marked from their past use.
24SMaterial Histories G948667ArchitectureTorello, FrancescaMaterials affect the way we engage with a building and carry cultural meanings connected with complex histories, deeply and at times messily intertwined with the social, political and ecological context. In this seminar we will look at the history of the architecture of the last two centuries by following the thread of the history of materials. We will discuss the ways in which buildings of the past and the practice of architecture were affected by which materials were available, how they were produced, and the craft required to work them. We will reflect on how architects interpreted, manipulated, or added to those meanings through their own work. Materials' lifecycles and the networks of extraction, production, transportation, and reuse had an impact on the built environment in the past, just as they do today. We will learn from historical examples to assess the consequences of the choices we make as designers. Finally, we will critically engage with the presence of history as a layer of complexity embedded in the material itself - an effect that is compounded in the practice of reuse of materials with patina, marked from their past use.
24SLEED, Green Infrastructure and Community Rating in Global ContextG648787ArchitectureBaird, NinaIf you're interested in community and infrastructure design, have you considered how "green" strategies may vary around the world? Are there universal goals for the design of sustainable transportation, water systems or energy infrastructure, or is there a national or local context? 48795 A4 is a graduate level mini-course that compares global community and infrastructure rating systems to gain perspective about these topics. The course uses two rating systems--the LEED Cities & Communities Rating System and Envision, from the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure¿as springboards for exploration and discussion of world rating systems that address these topics. The course provides a foundation for taking USGBC's LEED Green Associate and/or LEED Accredited Professional exams, or the ISI Envision Sustainability Professional exam and is designed to hone your critical thinking about sustainable urban design and infrastructure development in a global context.
24SLEED: LEED, Green Design and Building RatingsG648795ArchitectureBaird, NinaIf you're interested in sustainable infrastructure and community design, have you considered how "green" strategies may vary around the world? Are there universal goals for the design of sustainable transportation, water systems or energy infrastructure, or must green goals and design approaches be adapted to a national or local context? 48795 A4, LEED, Green Infrastructure and Community Rating in Global Context, is a graduate level mini-course that compares global community and infrastructure rating systems to gain perspective about sustainable infrastructure development and community design. The course uses two rating systems--the US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Cities & Communities Rating System and the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI) Envision Rating Systemas springboards for exploration and discussion of other world rating systems that address these topics. We'll consider how the goals and implementation of a rating system may reflect the national context in which the system was created and discuss emerging issues that may be omitted from these rating systems. The course provides a foundation for taking USGBC's LEED Green Associate and/or LEED Accredited Professional exams, or the ISI Envision Sustainability Professional exam and is designed to hone your critical thinking about sustainable urban design and infrastructure development in a global context.
24SEthics and Artificial Intelligence: Ethics and AIG645848TepperLeben, DerekThis course will explore the ethical challenges that businesses face when making use of AI, map out policies which have been proposed as solutions to these challenges, and analyze the normative arguments behind these policies. The goal of the course is to acquire the skills necessary to understand the ethical challenges which emerge from AI, and develop responsible corporate practices around these technologies. The course is organized around seven core principles for the responsible use of AI: (1) Autonomy, (2) Explainability, (3) Benefit, (4) Responsibility/Control, (5) Non-Discrimination, (6) Fairness, and (7) Dignity. We will focus on a different domain of use to illustrate each principle, including cases from transportation, healthcare, media, lending, and marketing.
24SSupply Chain Management: Supply Chain ManagementG645862TepperSul, InkiA supply chain is a network of facilities and distribution options that performs the functions of procurement of materials, transformation of these materials into intermediate and finished products, and the distribution of these finished products to customers (Ganeshan and Harrison, 1995). However, facilities are not necessarily connected in a serial fashion, despite its name. Therefore, a supply chain really describes a network of interconnected value-add transformations. Supply chain management (SCM) is the coordination of production, inventory, location, and transportation among the participants in a supply chain to achieve the best mix of responsiveness and efficiency for the market being served (Hugos, 2011). SCM includes the strategic design of this network, the tactical planning of supply, production, inventory, transportation, and distribution as well as the operational control of the flows of materials, information, money and physical goods. Traditionally, the goal of SCM has been to maximize profitability or minimize cost. Typically, this is achieved by matching supply and demand. Increasingly, the concept of risk, arising from uncertainty, disruptions, and need for rapid reaction, have also brought on the need to incorporate agility and responsiveness in the mix of goals. This course explores how firms can make better SCM decisions, focusing mostly on tactical challenges, but also touching on some strategic and operational topics. Throughout, this course illustrates qualitative as well as quantitative principles and business analytics applied to real SCM challenges ¿ the tools of SCM ¿ with an emphasis on approaches to increase responsiveness to manage risk.
24SEthics and Artificial Intelligence: Ethics and Artificial IntelligenceG646898TepperLeben, DerekThis course will explore the ethical challenges that businesses face when making use of AI, map out policies which have been proposed as solutions to these challenges, and analyze the normative arguments behind these policies. The goal of the course is to acquire the skills necessary to understand the ethical challenges which emerge from AI, and develop responsible corporate practices around these technologies. The course is organized around seven core principles for the responsible use of AI: (1) Autonomy, (2) Explainability, (3) Benefit, (4) Responsibility/Control, (5) Non-Discrimination, (6) Fairness, and (7) Dignity. We will focus on a different domain of use to illustrate each principle, including cases from transportation, healthcare, media, lending, and marketing.
24SThe American Railroad: Decline and Renaissance in the Age of DeregulationsUG670213TepperPosner, HenryRailroads in the USA are often considered as a subject for nostalgia or public sector failure, an image largely based on passenger service. However, the USA's private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a "stealth" industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Students will gain a basic understanding of the industry's history and economics and its role in the national transportation network, with special attention to the past half-century. In addition, students will participate in small group research projects in particular areas of special interest - for example, economic history, industry and safety culture, network economics, utility regulation or transportation policy.
24SExploring CEE: Infrastructure and Environment in a Changing WorldUG1212100Civil & Environmental EngineeringHarper, CoreyCivil and Environmental Engineers (CEEs) engage in the planning, design, construction, operation, retrofit, demolition, and reuse of large-scale infrastructure that forms the backbone of all societies and economies. CEEs work at the dynamic interface of the built environment, information environment, and natural environment. Therefore, societal domains that require CEE expertise include smart cities and construction, sustainable energy and buildings, connected and automated transportation systems, resilient infrastructure, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and water management. Students will explore how sensing, data science, environmental science, life cycle systems and economic analysis, and infrastructure design are integrated to create a built environment that meets the needs of smart and connected communities while enhancing sustainability. Students work on team-based design-build projects that introduce principles from environmental, structural, construction engineering, and project management. Students learn technical skills as well as methods for management and design considerations that include uncertainty, economics, and ethics, for modern and future infrastructure. 1 hr. lab.
24SSensing and Data Acquisition for Engineering SystemsUG412234Civil & Environmental EngineeringChristian, SarahCollecting and analyzing massive amounts of data is integral to understanding and managing the complexities of our infrastructure systems. Civil and environmental engineers need to select tools and to collect data to gain an understanding of the problems they are trying to solve. In this course, students will learn how to choose and use a range of measuring tools from simple hand tools to advanced sensors to collect data in laboratory-based and system-level studies, followed by data acquisition and processing. Experiment subjects will span the breadth of the fields including, for example, structural, geotechnical, environmental, and transportation engineering. The sensors and data will be used to assess not only an individual infrastructure component, but also infrastructure systems and networks. Students will complete planning activities for each of the experiments, conduct experiments, and acquire the resulting data from sensors and other measurements. Results and analysis will be submitted as part of a report or post-laboratory assignment.
24SAdvanced Computing and Problem Solving in Civil and Environmental EngineeringUG912371Civil & Environmental EngineeringQian, SeanBuilding upon the fundamentals developed in 12-271, this course introduces students to advanced topics in computational problem solving that are critical for implementing and interpreting computational solutions in civil and environmental engineering practice. These topics include numerical methods (both deterministic and stochastic) for approximation, differentiation, and integration in high dimensions; topics in numerical linear algebra for data science (including applications of QR factorization, singular-value decomposition, and Cholesky factorization); an introduction to clustering, regression, and classification; an introduction to statistical sampling; an introduction to graph and network theory; topics in deterministic and stochastic optimization; an introduction to scripting and automation; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations (including finite differences and basic finite-element analysis); and practices for effective visualization of large data sets. Each topic is presented with real-world civil and environmental engineering problems, in areas such as smart cities, transportation, energy, buildings, and hydrology. An emphasis is placed on identifying the appropriate computational method for any specific problem; additional emphasis is placed on developing computational thinking. This course culminates in a project, which requires students to synthesize their computational reasoning skills in order to solve a challenging civil and environmental engineering problem.
24SClimate Change AdaptationG612749Civil & Environmental EngineeringOzis, FethiyeWhile the specific timing and magnitude of climate change impacts are uncertain, long-lived civil engineering infrastructure will need to be resilient to these potential impacts. Engineers designing for climate change adaptation require the tools to maximize resiliency and minimize cost for existing and proposed energy, transportation, water, urban and other types of infrastructure. Students successfully completing this course will understand how climate change affects civil infrastructure and how to quantitatively incorporate resilient designs and co-benefits under uncertainty. Students will use open data to examine current adaptation engineering challenges, quantify solutions, and communicate their technical recommendations through policy briefs. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
24SFoundations of Intelligent Infrastructure Systems: Foundations of Intelligent Infrastructure SystemsG1212774Civil & Environmental EngineeringFlanigan, KatherineThe proliferation of low-cost and high-performing sensors, advancements in wireless communication, and ubiquitous access to cloud computing services have led to the emergence of "intelligent" infrastructure systems. Intelligent infrastructure systems are those systems in which civil and environmental engineering professionals combine sensing, computing, and actuation to enhance the performance, resilience, accessibility, and sustainability of infrastructure systems. These infrastructure systems are often of significant economic importance, dynamic (with a time basis to their behavior), and comprise complex interactions between cyber, physical, natural, and social components. This course conveys recent advancements enabling intelligent infrastructure systems and serves as a rigorous introduction to the fundamentals of dynamic systems theory applied to infrastructure systems. The systems science introduced in this course emphasizes modeling dynamic systems as continuous and discrete-time systems (Laplace domain and Z-domain system models, respectively), transformation methods between the time and frequency domains, feedback control of dynamic systems, and state space system models. Coursework and examples will be drawn from applications in modeling, monitoring, and controlling structural, transportation, hydraulic, and electrical systems.
24SEnergy Demand and UtilizationG639611Cit InterdisciplinaryBlackhurst, MichaelThis course examines how human demands for energy have evolved over time and how they differ across nations. The course begins from a historical perspective and proceeds to an evaluation of present demand and synthesis of future projections. The course focuses on the technologies used in the different sectors: housing, commerce, food, industry and transportation. Students successfully completing this course will become familiar with a variety of tools for energy analysis and measurement, including some fundamentals of economic analysis, energy efficiency, and demand response. We will also analyze strategies for inducing the adoption of efficient technologies and consumption.
24SAutonomous DrivingG1218744Electrical & Computer EngineeringRajkumar, RagunathanAutonomous vehicles (AVs) promise to (a) significantly reduce or even eliminate fatalities, injuries and damage from automotive crashes; (b) replace driving times with other productive work; and (c) provide independence, flexibility and a better quality of life to legally-blind and differently-abled individuals by giving them transportation options. At the same time, driving is one of the most complex tasks performed by humans on a regular basis. Put together, autonomous driving has become a deep engineering and technological challenge of our times. This course will expose students to the software architecture used in autonomous vehicles (AVs), and discuss in-depth each of the many layers underlying AVs. These layers include sensing, perception, localization, driving behaviors, route planning, path planning, vehicular communications, control, fault management and user interfaces.
24SThe American Railroad: Decline and Renaissance in the Age of DeregulationUG619213Engineering & Public PolicyPosner, HenryRailroads in the USA are often considered as a subject for nostalgia or public sector failure, an image largely based on passenger service. However, the USA's private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a "stealth" industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Students will gain a basic understanding of the industry's history and economics and its role in the national transportation network, with special attention to the past half-century. In addition, students will participate in small group research projects in particular areas of special interest - for example, economic history, industry and safety culture, network economics, utility regulation or transportation policy.
24SOptimization for DASUG694433HeinzZhang, PeterThis course provides an introduction to modeling and computational methods used by policy-makers, managers and analysts to support decision-making. The first half of the course focuses on deterministic optimization, and covers linear programming, network optimization and integer programming. The second half of this course introduces risk and uncertainty, and includes methods to characterize uncertainty and methods to optimize decisions under uncertainty. Examples are drawn from a variety of domains where these decision-making methods can provide value for business and policy, such as transportation, energy, health care, manufacturing, supply chain management, etc. The readings, lectures, homework assignments and exams will help you develop modeling skills, computational skills, and analytical skills. Modeling skills involve translating a problem into a well-defined mathematical framework, using little more than pen and paper. Computational skills involve solving your model on a computer program. In this course, all applications will be done in Excel. Analytical skills involve critically interpreting a model and translating results into insights for decision-making. All three are important!
24SIntroduction to Science, Technology, and SocietyUG979170HistoryAronson, JayScience and technology are among the most powerful transformative forces in today's global society. They shape the way we think about ourselves, the world around us, and even what is possible in the future. This course provides an introduction to Science and Technology Studies, a vibrant interdisciplinary field that examines the ways that science and technology interact with contemporary politics, culture, and society. Using theories and methods from history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, and public policy, we will examine: the nature of scientific and technical knowledge; how facts are produced both inside and outside the laboratory; how politics and societal values impact scientific inquiry and the development of new technologies; whether objectivity is possible; what expertise is and the role that experts play in the world today; how our understanding of science and technology has been enhanced by focusing on issues of race, sex, gender, sexuality, and class; as well as the imperative to make science and technology more equitable and just than they have been in the past. Specific topics covered will include the development of military technologies like radar and the atomic bomb, genetic engineering and cloning, artificial intelligence, social media, transportation infrastructure, racial classification, gender identity, and the Covid-19 pandemic, among others. This course is meant to serve as a foundation for the new Science, Technology, and Society major, but it is open to anyone concerned with the social and political dimensions of science and technology.
24SThe American Railroad: Decline and Renaissance in the Age of DeregulationUG666213DietrichPosner, HenryRailroads in the USA are often considered as a subject for nostalgia or public sector failure, an image largely based on passenger service. However, the USA's private sector freight rail industry is considered a model for the world as the result of its renaissance following deregulation in 1980. This is a "stealth" industry whose history and economics are both intertwined and complex. Students will gain a basic understanding of the industry's history and economics and its role in the national transportation network, with special attention to the past half-century. In addition, students will participate in small group research projects in particular areas of special interest - for example, economic history, industry and safety culture, network economics, utility regulation or transportation policy.
24SDecision Making Under UncertaintyG695760Information Systems:Sch Of Is & MgtZhang, Peter / Resnick, Adam / Choi, DavidThis course provides an introduction to modeling and computational methods used by policy-makers, managers and analysts to support decision-making. The first half of the course focuses on deterministic optimization, and covers linear programming, network optimization and integer programming. The second half of this course introduces risk and uncertainty, and includes methods to characterize uncertainty and methods to optimize decisions under uncertainty. Examples are drawn from a variety of domains where these decision-making methods can provide value for business and policy, such as transportation, energy, health care, manufacturing, supply chain management, etc. The readings, lectures, homework assignments and exams will help you develop modeling skills, computational skills and analytical skills. Modeling skills involve translating a problem into a well-defined mathematical framework, using little more than pen and paper. Computational skills involve solving your model on a computer program. In this course, all applications will be done in Excel. Analytical skills involve critically interpreting a model and translating results into insights for decision-making. All three are important!
24SIntroduction to Geographical Information SystemsAll667279Information Systems ProgramWeinberg, RandyGeographical Information Systems (GIS) allow us to visualize information that uses location. Through displaying layers of information in computer generated maps, we can see, analyze, understand and explore spatial patterns and relationships in new and novel ways. People in many different fields use Geographical Information Systems in their work: for visualizing the environment, human development, demographics, traffic and transportation, public health and many more. In this course, students will learn the basics of GIS through hands-on experience with popular mapping tools. Sources of data, principles of coordinate and projection systems and elementary geo-analysis techniques will be included. Upon completion of the course, students will have the background to begin using GIS techniques in their own areas of interest and will be prepared for further study in advanced GIs courses.
24SIntermediate French I OnlineUG982203Modern LanguagesHoogstaden, EsterThis course presents an integrated approach to studying the French language and culture by zooming in and out across three Francophone cities: Point-à-Pitre in Guadeloupe, Lyon in France, and Montréal in Québec. The course includes grammar review, literary and cultural reading and analysis, and intensive practice in written and spoken French. This course explores the history, transportation, music, foods, and architecture of Francophone cities with an aim to foster cross-cultural awareness and self-realization while developing proficiency in French. This course meets once a week in person for an 80-minute conversation session. Students engage in video analysis, reading analysis, and other activities online to prepare for the 80-minute conversation courses. In addition, students will meet once a week for a one-on-one meeting with the tutor or instructor for conversation and practice. 
24SReading Into a New China II: Transportation, Education, Pop Culture, & HealthUG982332Modern LanguagesWang, HaixiaA continuation of Advanced Chinese I, this course is designed to train students' language proficiency in functioning with Chinese in situations beyond their everyday life. Students will continue to learn more complex language phenomena in order to do exposition, explanation, description and argumentation with Chinese. These language phenomena will be introduced to students together with their social and cultural backgrounds through texts and multimedia programs related to various social issues. Classroom discussions and research project presentations will be the major forms of oral practice, and writing practice will mainly focus on essays and research papers. All the discussions and research projects will focus on issues related to traffic, education, employment, pop cultures, healthy living, and other human relations as well as economic situations in China today.
24SOperations Research IUG921292Mathematical SciencesOffner, DavidOperations research offers a scientific approach to decision making, most commonly involving the allocation of scarce resources. This course develops some of the fundamental methods used. Linear programming: the simplex method and its linear algebra foundations, duality, post-optimality and sensitivity analysis; the transportation problem; the critical path method; non-linear programming methods. (Three 50 minute lectures, one 50 minute recitation)
24SResilient & Sustainable CommunitiesUG1290489Public Policy & Mgt:Sch Of Pub Pol & MgtMehalik, MatthewThis course is a parallel listing for the graduate level listing of 90-789 under the same title. This course examines past and current community development topics and trends associated with creating and/or maintaining resilient and sustainable communities. Such topics include sustainable development, community equity, creative capitalism, regional planning and visioning, environmental justice, governance, regional equitable development, sustainable business practices, green/clean tech, smart growth and smart transportation, carbon management, resource conservation, local living economies, energy systems and strategies, dynamics of neighborhoods, among other topics. Emphasis will fall on how these various dimensions need to strategically align to promote sustainable communities amidst their complexities. The class will also delve into a variety of community development practices to provide frameworks for integrating just, equitable, and fair community development practices with sustainable development practices. The class takes lessons from the past (both what has worked and what did not work) as well as appropriate, current practices and explores how to apply them to a variety of community situations and conditions. The focus is on urban communities in the U.S and worldwide, both large and small. The course includes experiential, hands-on learning (projects, case studies, analyses, presentations, field trips, and guest lectures) as well as reflective components (readings, discussion, and papers).

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