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Colette Kress, Nvidia’s CFO, boldly stated on a call with investors Wednesday that “nearly every automotive company working on AI is working with Nvidia.” And company revenues from the automotive industry rose 21% to a record $1.1 billion last year.

The tech giant thinks those good fortunes will continue. “We expect Nvidia’s automotive data center processing demand to grow significantly,” Kress added.

Nvidia currently works with several hundred companies in the auto world, including carmakers, truck makers, robotaxis, sensor manufacturers, and startups. Its high-profile automaker customers include Mercedes, Volvo, and Hyundai. And Tesla was one of the tech giant’s biggest customers in 2023, buying 15,000 of Nvidia’s most popular, super pricey AI chips (H100 GPUs), according to a report from D.A. Davidson.

It’s not necessarily just H100s that car companies use, though. Nvidia has a full software system that runs on its GPUs for self-driving vehicles called Nvidia Drive. It can be used for fully autonomous cars or as a co-pilot for human drivers.

California has blocked a Google-backed driverless car company from expanding to more cities after a series of accidents.

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has suspended a request by Waymo, which is owned by Google’s parent company, to launch its robotaxi business in more cities within the state.

Vehicles from Waymo and Cruise, a rival, have been operating in San Francisco for years. Waymo had been seeking permission to expand to Los Angeles and the wider San Francisco peninsula.

However, David Canepa, a local politician in San Mateo County, California, said its application had been paused because of what he claimed was Waymo’s failure to engage in “meaningful” discussion about “our very real public safety concerns”.

It follows public opposition to driverless cars and a string of accidents.”\

With GPS data from as little as 6% of vehicles on the road, University of Michigan researchers can recalibrate traffic signals to significantly reduce congestion and delays at intersections.

In an 18-month pilot study conducted in Birmingham, Michigan, the team used connected vehicle data insights provided by General Motors to test its system, resulting in a 20% to 30% decrease in the number of stops at signalized intersections. GM vehicles make up 6-10% of cars currently on the road in the United States.

Officially, it’s the world’s first large-scale, cloud-based traffic signal retiming system, and it represents a major opportunity for communities to recalibrate their signal patterns at a reduced cost. U-M’s research appears in Nature Communications.

The federal government, which has been slow to complete comprehensive regulations for automated driving systems, is mulling proposed standards for self-driving commercial vehicles.

The proposed rule is expected this spring from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and would be in many ways a first step, as the bulk of policy governing the autonomous vehicle industry has come from a patchwork of state and local governments. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration has issued only limited autonomous vehicle standards to date.

But even as automakers race to deploy the next generation of self-driving vehicles, sources familiar with federal rule-making say that the administration isn’t likely to propose a framework for passenger vehicles soon.

That runs counter to the wishes of some lawmakers in Congress, like Rep. Bob Latta, R-Ohio, who has introduced legislation multiple times that would require the Transportation Department to create a rule-making plan for the deployment of highly automated vehicles.

Microwave detection doesn’t produce an image, but instead sends a signal when a vehicle is detected in a targeted area. Video cameras, however, would provide a real-time view. “We will be able to look through those cameras and see what’s going on,” said Reinbacher. State law prevents the city from using the cameras to issue traffic enforcement citations.

Responding to a question from Alderman Russell W. Stamper, II, Reinbacher said the new equipment would also allow the city to take traffic counts for vehicles and pedestrians and determine which direction motorists turn. The resulting data, said the DPW representative, would yield an improvement in safety through changes to signal timing…

The city’s cost for the advanced traffic management system procurement is to be $96,000. Two separate $1 million CMAQ grants were awarded to fund the installation of advanced traffic controller systems at intersections.

With GPS data from as little as 6% of vehicles on the road, University of Michigan researchers can recalibrate traffic signals to significantly reduce congestion and delays at intersections.

In an 18-month pilot study conducted in Birmingham, Michigan, the team used connected vehicle data insights provided by General Motors to test its system, resulting in a 20% to 30% decrease in the number of stops at signalized intersections. GM vehicles make up 6-10% of cars currently on the road in the United States.

Officially, it’s the world’s first large-scale, cloud-based traffic signal retiming system, and it represents a major opportunity for communities to recalibrate their signal patterns at a reduced cost. U-M’s research appears in Nature Communications.

AAA has tested reverse automatic emergency braking, known as AEB, and the results are in. AEB is designed to automatically activate a vehicle’s brakes when it senses a rear crash. According to AAA, it only prevented a crash in ½ of their tests when a pedestrian was standing behind the car.

When it was traffic moving behind a car, it only prevented a crash in 2.5% of tests.

“It’s important that drivers realize this that the technologies are not foul proof and they remain alert, particularly backing up we’ve seen unfortunately some back over crashes where children where playing behind a vehicle that was in the driveway and a parent came out and jumped in the vehicle and tragically backed right over the child so it’s important that drivers do walk arounds like pilots do with planes.” said Robert Sinclair of AAA Northeast.

According to code found in Tesla’s latest update, Tesla will add “accident” and “closed road” icons to its maps. These icons are expected to give drivers near real-time updates on road conditions, allowing them to make informed decisions and avoid delays. This feature, in addition to the previously added icons such as stop signs, traffic lights, and red light speed cameras helps Tesla maps compete with mobile apps that have this information such as Google Maps and Waze.

While Green found references to these new icons in the 2024.2 update, these features are not yet active but are expected to be added in the near future.

Accident and road closure information needs to be timely to be useful so it’s unlikely that Tesla is gathering this data themselves and instead leveraging an existing data provider that already supplies this information to other services. Waze relies on crowd-sourced data, and while possible, it’s unlikely that Tesla will rely on driver input to display this information.

Western Michigan University is using technology to take assisting people with vision impairments to the next level. A professor in the Department of Blindness and Low Vision Studies is working on an app that will help people get across the street more easily.

“We have submitted a proposal to develop a smartphone app that would help us train blind pedestrians, reduce veering,”” Dr. Dae Kim told FOX 17.

The app would be called Artificial Intelligence-Aided Anti-Veering Training. “So pedestrians’ unintended deviation from the straight-line path is called ‘veering,’ and veering by blind pedestrians could be problematic,” Kim explained.

The app is designed to let users know when they’re veering to the left or to the right and by how many feet. Kim told FOX 17 the technology could save lives. “Being able to reduce their veering, blind pedestrians will be able to reduce the risk of accidentally getting hurt by those incidents.””

The Fern Hollow Bridge should have been closed before widespread corrosion and section loss caused its spectacular collapse in January 2022 in Frick Park, severely injuring several commuters, National Transportation Safety Board investigators said in a hearing Wednesday.

For more than a decade, local officials failed repeatedly to address known maintenance and repair recommendations that were outlined in inspection reports from 2005 to 2021, which led to continued deterioration and the eventual collapse of the bridge, according to investigators.

“Its conditions dictated that it should have been closed,” said Dan Walsh, structural engineer at the NTSB.

As part of its comprehensive investigation — which is expected to be released fully next month — the NTSB found that the city and state bridge inspection programs were “ineffective” and not compliant with federal and industry standards…

“The Fern Hollow Bridge collapse should never have happened.”

The field of autonomous racing didn’t begin with race cars on professional race tracks but with miniature cars at robotics conferences. In 2015, my colleagues and I engineered a 1/10 scale autonomous race car. We transformed a remote-controlled car into a small but powerful research and educational tool, which I named F1tenth, playing on the name of the traditional Formula One, or F1, race car. The F1tenth platform is now used by over 70 institutions worldwide to construct their miniaturized autonomous racers.

The F1tenth Autonomous Racing Grand Prix is now a marquee event at robotics conferences where teams from across the planet gather, each wielding vehicles that are identical in hardware and sensors, to engage in what is essentially an intense “”battle of algorithms.”” Victory on the track is claimed not by raw power but by the advanced AI algorithms’ control of the cars.

F1tenth has also emerged as an engaging and accessible gateway for students to delve into robotics research. Over the years, I’ve reached thousands of students via my courses and online lecture series, which explains the process of how to build, drive and autonomously race these vehicles.

San Mateo County’s Board of Supervisors says it wants the California Public Utility Commission to reconsider allowing Waymo to operate in the county. The board is also supporting a proposed bill that will allow local governments to decide if they want driverless cars on the road.

The Board cited safety concerns and technical issues as major factors in its stance. Senator Dave Cortese also says the bill will give local governments more control and hold driverless car companies more accountable.

“”This technology is not ready for primetime”” said David Canepa, San Mateo County Board of Supervisors Vice President.

San Mateo County Board Supervisor David Canepa says the board has unanimously decided to support Senate Bill 915, which will give local governments the power to decide if it wants driverless cars on its streets. Right now, the CPUC decides where driverless companies can operate, and it approved Waymo’s application to expand to San Mateo County last month.

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